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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
, extremist, very intolerant prejudices that were taking place among the various religions of the world, she said, i grew up in an environment which was christian, which people followed their christian religion. others followed their muslim religion and others their african superstitions. and for me, this went to the heart of why the book became inevitable, or why i have been engaged in this discourse all my life. very strange. i find it very -- pretty close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which, for believing what i believe, or not believing what i do not believe, i'd be considered what i call terminal censorship. and go back to my history, and i don't mean me personally. the time when i lived and was raised. the history of my people. when the european explorers, of course, quickly followed by their religious storm troopers, the christian missionaries. they had a very serious problem and that was they couldn't find satan. they couldn't find the devil. if you want to convert people, you've got to first of all persuade them their soul is in dire danger. headed to the ult
24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time
is what is coming out this christmas day. george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then, singer/songwriter james taylor from a recent appearance of the national press club. after that, first lady michelle obama holds a holiday party with goldstar families. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handed leaflets for robert kennedy, and i always say when i was 10 and made the decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went to the liberal party headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in the new york. someone thought it was really cute, a little boy handed out leaflets, and she ask me why, and then made the case and the case against the opponent as well, and she said this was for you, and she handed me a box that looked like pastries, the white box with strings. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters, and there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and he said
:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. columnist in a news analyst talks about the relationship with religion and american politics. he was introduced by the former missouri senator and ambassador to the united nations and john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special co
between religion and politics. james taylor and his recent appearance at the national press club. later, michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was h
rights. the government does that give those rights depended on your religion, economic class, a gender, or theoretically your sexual orientation. that is the way it is supposed to be. some libertarians already get that who have a special obligation to te
nihilism or atheism. the first amendment, congress shall make no law to establish religion or their free exercise thereof. in other words, stay out of it. obviously it assumes -- and there is god. we knew what the religions were. the baptist conventions, they weren't like worshiping a pope. they believed in god. i'm not going to revise history. i grew up in a religious environment and i'm proud of it. i am proud of it but i thank god i believe in god or i would probably be enormously angry right now. so they i am grateful and unapologetic. >> one interesting sort of -- it is remarkable when we started talking a little bit about how the sub by this change over time and we could have could've also edit the 19th amendment, women becoming part of this ever greater ark of democratic inclusion. >> and prohibition. i will drink to that. [laughter] >> but that was repealed. in general most of the amendments, as you said before, maybe more perfect. >> or less perfect perk is. >> but then we got rid of it. >> i don't drink so i understand. [laughter] >> on revision is pretty extraordinary, the con
on the basis -- outlawed discrimination on the basis of discrimination -- religion, and sex. and 1950s, law firms, and some of the finest graduates were saying they wanted no women. they would feel uncomfortable dealing with a woman, or as often her, we hired a woman at this from once, and she was dreadful. how many men did they hire that didn't work out? so it wasn't easy to get that first job. first job was all important because if you got it and performed well, then the next job was secure. well, i had a great professor, someone may know you -- some of you may know his name, he was the first constitutional law scholar, and he was in charge of getting judicial clerkship for columbia law school students. and i was special. he was determined to give me a federal clerkship. so he recommended me to a judge who always hired his law clerks from columbia. and then -- [inaudible] is ruth bader ginsburg. she has a four year old daughter. how can i rely on her? and the professor said, give her a chance. if she doesn't work out, there's a man in her class who will step in and take over for her. if y
and said it is as much about economic inequality as religion. she traces much today's problems back to ferdinand marcos. >> the government insiitute a lot of government policies that suppressed the muslim population. and after that, the military really violated human. >> reporter: that sowed the seeds for radicalization by some rebel fighters. by the 1990s a regional al qaeda affiliate began to thrive. >> to even help you understand why you're oppressed. >> reporter: are they growing? >> as far as we're concernedr: it's not growing. >> reporter: army major carlospe sole says they have largely been contained as a military threat in part helped by u.s. advisers who remain in the region. philippine officials also note that the peace treaty gives them more autonomy and control over resources. factions on either side remain unhappy with the peace process and there are frequent localized clashes, and trust continues to be in short ply. that's a void both the militaryy and the main rebel group the milf, say foreign civilians can fill effectively. >> only an armed civiliani protects the mon
no religion. you work with muslim women. do you see erosion? >> there's two schools of thought on this the vast majority of american muslims don't, in fact attend mosques. there are a lot of reasons for that. our mainstream institutions we were talking about this earlier, has seemed to lost relevance for everyday muslims. for women, spaces aren't always as accommodating as they should be. they might see the imam or mosque as an external funding source that mean as what is taught there isn't necessarily quite in line with euro own values so what we're seeing not necessarily an erosion of faith but they're finding new ways of fellow fellowship together and more reasons to bring people to the table. >> i think that's the key insight here. we're seeing two things happen diminishment of mainstream relidge. fastest group is nones, n-o-n-e-s and praise. this has to do with a mistrusted institution, mixing and blending of people. people can speak across boundaries where they never could. people can enter other people's faith systems, borrow other's resources an
-government. religion didn't tolerate it in political culture and family culture does not tolerate it. this is a lost cause. we must not involve ourselves. so he would not involve less in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, political history or religious history of self-government. they don't know what it means. >> and what would you like? >> i'm not quite sure what he was late. >> even federalists would be appalled at the federal government intrusion in our lives today. it is in every area of our lives. veterans commit the troops bedrooms, living rooms, garages, rose, everywhere the federal government is in our lives and that would have appalled the most extreme federalists who founded this type of government. the first thing he would done, patrick and i would have gone right along with him. they would've gone in your bedroom and threats of attack that tag for the mattress. >> will entertain questions for the audience. they urge you in homage brian lamb, founder of c-span who tuning asks the best questions, which are simple and direct, we
many ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and yet we are bound together as one people because of our allegiance and our respect and our reverence for the constitution, and this is a link, a tie, a bond to our history and to our heritage. that is unique or almost unique in the world. this tie that we have to our constitution that defines us gives us stability and a purpose and a mission to our people. and it is the envy of the rest of the world. the british revere their constitution as well. not quite the same. william gladstone, prime minister of england, at one time talked -- compared the american and thening lish -- the english constitution. he began by saying the english constitution was grown, the american substitution was something that was made. if you ended there, you might have thought it was rather patronizing, the english constitution was made and the american constitution, made. he went on to refer to the american constitution in the most laudatory an complementary of terms. he said in that same statement, just as the british constitution is the most shuttle organism ever
free speech rights in the first amendment. why wouldn't they have the free exercise of religion rights that are also in fact, they start the first amendment as the religious -- i think it's a very important point to make that though hobby lobby has had a tough time taking this to get the preliminary injunction, nothing has been decided on the merits. we actually just won yesterday in 7th court of appeals. our client. corporation. not a religious organization. a regular company. they got the injunction, we have done that for two other of our clients we're 3 for 3. the judges matter in this situation who you get before you this is important precedent. how many companies might have an objection to providing the morning after pill. what justice society to my your said they are not religious organizations. how do you get around that burden? >> i think you get around the burden by saying forever legal purposes this is not a fun term for people and it's true. this is how the law works. when you look at the law really holding here it's the first amendment. really the religious freedom restorat
, no matter your ethnic group, religion or sexual orientation. that's what we fought for in 2012. and that's what we're determined to keep the fight on in 2013. i'll be there and i hope you're there with us. as we go forward. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. please join us monday, new year's eve, at 6:00 p.m. for the second annual revvie awards. on behalf of everyone here at politics nation, have a safe and h happy new year. "hardball" starts right now. >> deal or no deal. let's play ""hardball." >> good evening. i'm richard wolf in for chris matthews. at the 11th hour, just when people were starting to lose hope, the president met with congressional leaders this afternoon and declared he was modestly optimistic about a deal on taxes. speaking in the white house briefing room, president obama condemned congress for failing to resolve its differences in any normal way. >> christin, let's take a listen to what the president said about the up or down vote about what he expects to emerge from the senate. >> i just had a good and constructive discussion here at the white house with senate
is the religion has totally for ben for gay people to get married. second of all we have others who did mention earlier about equal opportunity that every person has the right to get married regardless of whether they are male or female. the last plane like to make it say what this young person who can say to to me they shouldn't have been voted for the make your mark ballot. instead it should have been young people and the police, which is by far more important. thank you. [applause] >> and i'm not just to say because they see a small number of people standing up who have spoken before and i welcome your csm, but in fairness to people who haven't had a chance to speak, i need to be looking for those who have not spoken before the debate. the woman in the back row. yes, it is you. >> i am representing. it is love, care and dedication between two people. if those two people know they love each other, is it unfair to say they need to have it written on paper and writing on paper for his love more important. there are other issues were important we are facing which need to be addressed. please do
. >> it is a stable situation because my, what the obama administration's argument basically says, religion is entirely private matter. you're allowed to have your private little ritual in head inch a way rooms and synagogues and mosque but the second it enters the public square it has to be bent and contorted to fit whatever the government says it should do. so the, the obama administration doesn't talk about freedom of religion. it talks about freedom of worship which is distinction they think it is very important. it means you are allowed to do whatever you want religiously in private, but the second it touches the government square the government wins over religious conscience. >> what strikes me, and we've done this story before, the folks at hobby lobby are not just using this to avoid something. they appear to be incredibly sincere in their religious beliefs. >> yeah. i mean, there is no profit motive in here that i think is really meaningful. this is the biggest company so far to question the hhs mandate and, you know, i think people would understand it more viscerally if we were ta
refer to religion things in code and jesus was the partridge in a pear tree. >> bill: i was supposed to know that? what an uplifting christmas question when henry the eighth was beheading all the catholics they thought jesus was a bird so they could live. and a merry christmas to you, doocy. >> thanks very much. >> bill o'reilly, thank you very much. >> any time. >> steve: for gracing us with your wisdom. >> brian: that is so fantastic. >> gretchen: so great he wasn't out of character. >> merry christmas. >> brian: same character in the hallway or office. >> steve: usually at 9:00 eastern time. ali over to you. >> alisyn: voices of rise into the heavens these teenagers are keeping the tradition of gospel music alive. we are joined gospel for teens and program director. it's great to have all of you here today. >> thank you. >> alisyn: thanks so much for being with us. >> it's so exciting. >> alisyn: wait until everyone hears your beautiful voices we will get to that in a second. i want to talk to you about the program. you stated that the goal is to bring gospel into the lives of kid
this week and there were a few issues raised by support. number one is the religion has totally for ben for gay people to get married. second of all we have others who did mention earlier about equal opportunity that every person has the right to get married regardless of whether they are male or female. the last plane like to make it say what this young person who can say to to me they shouldn't have been voted for the make your mark ballot. instead it should have been young people and the police, which is by far more important. thank you. [applause] >> and i'm not just to say because they see a small number of people standing up who have spoken before and i welcome your csm, but in fairness to people who haven't had a chance to speak, i need to be looking for those who have not spoken before the debate. the woman in the back row. yes, it is you. >> i am representing. it is love, care and dedication between two people. if those two people know they love each other, is it unfair to say they need to have it written on paper and writing on paper for his love more important. there are othe
of the color of their skin or what their parents were born or what their religion was. he was first chairman of the senate select committee on intelligence. he served a distinction is chairman of the commerce committee and appropriations committee. during this time as chairman indian affairs committee he turned to neglect many into a powerful voice for native populations across this great country and remarkably coming cancer for more than 34 years of his best friend from a late republican senator, ted stevens of alaska on the defense appropriations subcommittee. their friendship is also working relationship stands as an example of the remarkable things to senators can accomplish when they set political party aside. there were a formidable force, as part of this nations than in women, working to ensure soldiers, sailors, airmen and guardsmen of the best trained in the best equipped intensive piece in times of war. senator in a way also served as a member of the watergate country as chairman of the committee investigating the iran-contra affair. whenever there was a difficult job to do, whenev
will on the historical link between religion and politics. at 10:50, singer-songwriter and james taylor, on c-span. >> the senate returns to legislative business on thursday and house as a performance session scheduled that day. the senate is in at 10:00 a.m. eastern for work on two bills. the first would extend provisions of the foreign intelligence surveillance act. the other is a relief package for those affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on our companion network, c-span2. house members are on standby as negotiations continue on the so- called fiscal cliff. >host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and health benefits could be impacted. joining us is josh boak. when we are talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are talking about here? guest: unemployment insurance is a combination of federal and state program. usually last 62 weeks. it is that extension beyond that six months time frame that we are talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. that is what automatically expires. we know that it costs about $30 billio
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)